UROP Project

Dual-hormone hypothesis and simulated aggression: an experimental study

Contact

Name

Daniel Holder

Program Director UROP

Telephone

workPhone
+49 241 80-90695

E-Mail

Key Info

Basic Information

Project Offer-Number:
975
Category:
Keine eindeutige Zuordnung
Field:
Psychology
Faculty:
10
Organisation unit:
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychosomatics & Psychotherapy, Child Neuropsychology
Language Skills:
English, German (working proficiency desirable but not mandatory)
Computer Skills:
Windows/Linux, Microsoft Package, SPSS/R/STATA/JASP, SPM/FSL (optional)
Professor:
Univ.-Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Kerstin Konrad

Testosterone (TEST) and Cortisol (CORT) are associated with emotional processing and inhibitory control. One theoretical framework proposes that impulsive and aggressive behaviours arise upon the modulatory effects of CORT on TEST synthesis and release. Specifically, this dual hormone hypothesis argues that low CORT and increased TEST levels conduce to retaliatory behaviours. We aim to directly assess the dual hormone hypothesis by temporarily suppressing CORT levels in a group of 100 healthy young adult males while pharmacologically elevating TEST levels. A low-dose Dexamethasone (1mg DXM) oral capsule or placebo (glucose) will be administered one day before (at approximately 23:00) study participation. The following morning participants come to the clinic’s laboratory where 100mg TEST-gel/placebo will be applied cutaneously on their upper back and shoulders. We are interested in the interaction between CORT and TEST which will be examined in a fully-randomised placebo-control.

Task

- Conduct literature reviews - Subject recruitment & Data collection - Behavioural and MRI data entry and analysis - Report writing

Requirements

- Knowledge of main statistical analyses and statistical packages - Willingness to acquire neuroimaging data analysis skills